Its fall, and the blooms of summer have faded. So why are you still sneezing? Fall allergy triggers are different, but they can cause just as many symptoms as in spring and summer.

Ragweed is the biggest allergy trigger in the fall. Though it usually starts to release pollen with cool nights and warm days in August, it can last into September and October. About 75% of people allergic to spring plants also have reactions to ragweed.

For some people who are allergic to ragweed, certain fruits and vegetables, including bananas, melon, and zucchini, can also cause symptoms.

Mold is another fall trigger. You may think of mold growing in your basement or bathroom — damp areas in the house — but mold spores also love wet spots outside. Piles of damp leaves are ideal breeding grounds for mold.

School Allergens – Its not only seasonal pollen and mold that triggers allergies this time of year. Kids are often exposed to classroom irritants and allergy triggers. These can include chalk dust and classroom pets.